Global Programs Executive Director Ann Robinson (center) and her daughter, Emma, (white top) joined visiting students from Beijing University of Chinese Medicine on a trip to Niagara Falls during their stay at Daemen.
Global Programs Executive Director Ann Robinson (center) and her daughter, Emma, (white top) joined visiting students from Beijing University of Chinese Medicine on a trip to Niagara Falls during their stay at Daemen.
Global Programs Executive Director Ann Robinson (center) and her daughter, Emma, (white top) joined visiting
students from Beijing University of Chinese Medicine on a trip to Niagara Falls during their stay at Daemen.

After having an opportunity this summer to meet and exchange outcomes with Daemen College nursing students and faculty, Jun Li, a master’s level nursing student from Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, felt this was just a beginning.

“There should be more such exchanges,” she said. “We need more communication, more sharing of outcomes of treatment for our patients, between Western medicine and Chinese traditional medicine.”

Li is one of five students from Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (BUCM) who, together with their advisor, spent three weeks at Daemen. The educational exchange between Daemen and BUCM brought them to the Daemen campus from July 18 to August 9, for their first trip to the U.S. All of the students are pursuing either bachelor’s or master’s degrees in nursing

“In China, we do not have a position equivalent to the D.N.P.,” stated Xue Qiao, a master’s degree nursing student. “Doctor of Nursing Practice is more equivalent to a nurse practitioner, and will inspire nursing to grow and move beyond its traditions. We are very interested in bringing such a position to China.”

The BUCM students also pointed to Daemen’s nurse practitioner degree program, saying it provided additional chances to learn more about the nursing profession.

Zhihua Meng, who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree, observed, “Methods of examination of a patient’s symptoms by doctors are different here. That was just one of many things in our profession that had a different feeling here than in China. It opened our eyes, and gave us a new way of seeing these techniques.”

Outside of their nursing classes each of the students, together with their advisor, Lijuan Dong, pointed to the existence of Daemen’s service learning program as a significant difference between the U.S. and China. “A good thing, community service organizations dedicated to helping people,” noted Jun Li. “This was also a new concept for us to learn about. It is different here than in China.”

When not in the classroom, the students maintained a busy schedule, one that included sightseeing, shopping, museums, and a lot of social contact with members of the Daemen community.

Throughout their time in Western New York, Zhihua Meng — and all of her BUCM colleagues — said they felt warmly welcomed by members of the Daemen community. All agreed the time had passed very quickly once they arrived at Daemen.